Steve Reifman

Steve Reifman

Three Brand New "Learning How to Learn" Strategies:

This week I share three short videos that feature the final three independent learning strategies from the “Learning How to Learn” Workshop I presented to parents and students last fall. “Looking for a Pattern,” “Making Learning Implicit,” and “Using Metacognition & Reflection” round out my list of learning strategies that, taken together, offer children a variety of ways to learn and remember academic content. About two-thirds of my students attended the hour-long, after-school workshop, and I followed up with the families of the remaining children at a later time. Though I try to create rich, authentic, contextual learning experiences for my students on a daily basis, there are still times when they need to learn how to study and remember discrete pieces of information independently, especially as they progress through the upper elementary grades and into middle school and high school.

 

Friday, 24 February 2012 21:50

Learning How to Learn (Visuals)

A Brand New "Learning How to Learn" Strategy:

This week my video series features the use of visuals, the ninth independent learning strategy I shared during the “Learning How to Learn” Workshop I presented to parents and students last fall. (I’m skipping the eighth strategy, Pegging, in this video series because I don’t believe it has as much utility for elementary students as the other strategies I’m sharing.) Using a variety of colors, pictures, and images can produce excellent learning results. In the video I share specific strategies to help students spell more effectively and better understand paragraph structure. About two-thirds of my students attended the hour-long, after-school workshop, and I followed up with the families of the remaining children at a later time. Though I try to create rich, authentic, contextual learning experiences for my students on a daily basis, there are still times when they need to learn how to study and remember discrete pieces of information independently, especially as they progress through the upper elementary grades and into middle school and high school. 

 

Friday, 17 February 2012 21:50

Learning How to Learn (Music)

A Brand New "Learning How to Learn" Strategy:

This week my video series features music, the seventh independent learning strategy I shared during the “Learning How to Learn” Workshop I presented to parents and students last fall. Using music in a variety of ways as a study strategy yields powerful results. Especially helpful is the use of “piggyback songs.” When we take the tune of a familiar song and substitute content-related lyrics for the original lyrics, then we are using a piggyback song. About two-thirds of my students attended the hour-long, after-school workshop, and I followed up with the families of the remaining children at a later time. Though I try to create rich, authentic, contextual learning experiences for my students on a daily basis, there are still times when they need to learn how to study and remember discrete pieces of information independently, especially as they progress through the upper elementary grades and into middle school and high school.

 

 

 

 

Friday, 10 February 2012 21:50

Learning How to Learn (Movement)

A Brand New "Learning How to Learn" Strategy:

This week my video series features movement, the sixth independent learning strategy I shared during the “Learning How to Learn” Workshop I presented to parents and students last fall. Incorporating movement into what would otherwise be sedentary study sessions makes a significant impact on learning. About two-thirds of my students attended the hour-long, after-school workshop, and I followed up with the families of the remaining children at a later time. Though I try to create rich, authentic, contextual learning experiences for my students on a daily basis, there are still times when they need to learn how to study and remember discrete pieces of information independently, especially as they progress through the upper elementary grades and into middle school and high school.

Friday, 03 February 2012 21:50

Learning How to Learn (Acronyms & Acrostics)

Two Brand New "Learning How to Learn" Strategies:

This week my new video series features the fourth and fifth independent learning strategies I shared during my “Learning How to Learn” Workshop: acronyms and acrostics. These mnemonic devices help students effectively learn discrete pieces of information. I hosted the workshop for my students and their families on October 26, 2011. About two-thirds of my students attended this hour-long, after-school workshop, and I followed up with the families of the remaining children at a later time. Though I try to create rich, authentic, contextual learning experiences for my students on a daily basis, there are still times when they need to learn how to study and remember discrete pieces of information independently, especially as they progress through the upper elementary grades and into middle school and high school.

Friday, 27 January 2012 21:50

Learning How to Learn (Novelty)

Brand New "Learning How to Learn" Strategy:

This week my new video series features the third independent learning strategy I shared during my “Learning How to Learn” Workshop: novelty. The human brain naturally remembers things that are off-the-wall, unexpected, and unusual. We can use this fact to help children learn academic content. I hosted this workshop for my students and their families on October 26, 2011. About two-thirds of my students attended this hour-long, after-school workshop, and I followed up with the families of the remaining children at a later time. Though I try to create rich, authentic, contextual learning experiences for my students on a daily basis, there are still times when they need to learn how to study and remember discrete pieces of information independently, especially as they progress through the upper elementary grades and into middle school and high school.

Two New "Learning How to Learn" Strategies:

This week my new video series features the first two independent learning strategies I shared during my “Learning How to Learn” Workshop: 1) Flash Cards and 2) Chunking. I hosted this workshop for my students and their families on October 26, 2011. About two-thirds of my students attended this hour-long, after-school workshop, and I followed up with the families of the remaining children at a later time. Though I try to create rich, authentic, contextual learning experiences for my students on a daily basis, there are still times when they need to learn how to study and remember discrete pieces of information independently, especially as they progress through the upper elementary grades and into middle school and high school.

Friday, 13 January 2012 21:50

Learning How to Learn (An Introduction)

New "Learning How to Learn" Video:

For the next month or two, my weekly blog series will be a weekly video series, and I will be featuring new instructional videos on YouTube. Including this week's video, I have seven videos posted on the site. This week's new video features a “Learning How to Learn” Workshop I hosted for my students and their families on October 26, 2011. About two-thirds of my students attended this hour-long, after-school workshop, and I followed up with the families of the remaining children at a later time. Though I try to create rich, authentic, contextual learning experiences for my students on a daily basis, there are still times when they need to learn how to study and remember discrete pieces of information independently, especially as they progress through the upper elementary grades and into middle school and high school.

Friday, 06 January 2012 21:50

Introducing My New Weekly Video Series

Introducing My New Weekly Video Series:

For the next month or two, my weekly blog series will be a weekly video series, and I will be featuring new instructional videos on YouTube. Currently, I have six videos posted on the site. The first video features two former students demonstrating the important role that revising plays in the writing process. The next four videos are part of my “Rock Your Students’ World” series and feature students demonstrating a variety of movement activities that help children learn academic content. The sixth video is the one I am debuting with this post.  In this video I share a powerful way for teachers to create a favorable first impression with students and their families at the beginning of each school year.

Click here to see my YouTube page that contains the six videos.

Empowering Moments (4th in an Occasional Series):

We are all familiar with the expression “teachable moment” that refers to those times in class when something happens that offers us an opportunity to impart a valuable lesson to our students. Recently, I first heard the expression “learnable moment,” which basically refers to these same opportunities, but focuses on what the children are gaining, rather than what the teachers are sharing. I love both of these expressions, but I have to say that I prefer the latter because of its emphasis on the student’s perspective.

In this blog series I introduce the expression “Empowering Moment.” An Empowering Moment is a classroom occurrence that affords teachers the opportunity to develop character, foster independence, and build students’ capacity for the future.